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Portrait of Lady Diana Cooke, Circle of Sir Peter Lely.
Oil on canvas in a 19th century frame.

LADY DIANA COOKE was born Diana Butler, daughter of Anthony Butler; she married Sir Henry Cooke, 2nd Baronet, the son of Sir Bryan Cooke and Sarah Ryley.
Sir Henry had succeeded to the title 2nd Baron Cooke of Wheatley Hall in 1683. He had married Diana in 1659, probably the time when this portrait was painted.
They had two children, Sir George, 3rd Baronet, and Henry.
Sir Henry Cooke, 2nd Baronet, died in 1683.

Wheatley Hall, Wheatley, Yorkshire was the magnificent family seat built by Sir Henry Cooke. (see image 5).
The powerful Cooke family lived there until 1914 when the then lord, Sir William, moved out. The Hall became a golf club and flats; in 1933 Doncaster Corporation bought the house and estate and used the land for housing, finally demolishing the Hall in 1938. Today a tractor factory stands on the site of Wheatley Hall.

SIR PETER LELY (1618 - 1680) was the most important portraitist in the reign of Charles ll, although he had painted portraits throughout the Commonwealth. Principal Painter to the King, he painted everyone of importance, maintaining a busy and active Studio to help with the huge demand for his portraits.

SIZE: 45 x 38.5 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE:Private Collection, Bristol.
VERSO: Two old inscriptions identifying the sitter (spelling her surname without the 'e') and attributing the painting to Sir Peter Lely. Old Christies stencilled number.
Ref: 8844
This item has been sold





Portrait of Lady Diana de Vere, later Duchess of St. Albans; after Kneller, 18th century.
Oil on canvas in a fine quality William Kent giltwood frame. The frame is a 19th century replica of top quality, as good as an original 18th c.one.

The British Palladian or 'Kent' frame, with its distinctive outset corners, is called after the architect and designer William Kent (1685-1748); he derived it from the late Mannerist work of Michelangelo, interpreted by Palladio and Inigo Jones. Kent, however, used it as part of a coherent interior, where for the first time architecture, fittings and furniture were designed as a single whole. The painting and its frame were completely integrated with the overall setting. The 'Kent' frame was decorated with strong classical mouldings, such as egg-&-dart, ribbon-&-stave and Greek fret.

This beautiful portrait is an 18th century head and shoulders version of the large three quarter length painted by Sir Godfrey Kneller for Queen Mary's collection, the Hampton Court Beauties.


LADY DIANA DE VERE, DUCHESS OF ST. ALBANS (c.1679-1742) was the daughter of Aubrey de Vere, 20th Earl of Oxford and Diana Kirke. She married Charles Beauclerk, 1st Duke of St. Albans, illegitimate son of Charles II, King of Great Britain and his mistress the actress Nell Gwyn, on 17 April 1694.
The union produced twelve children.
She was Mistress of the Robes to Caroline, Princess of Wales from 1714 to 1717. She was one of the Hampton Court Beauties of Mary II of England.

SIR GODFREY KNELLER (1646-1723) was the most distinguished painter of baroque portraits in England.
Born in Lubeck, he trained with Bol and Rembrandt, coming to London in 1676.
By 1679 he had painted the King and remained the most famous and successful portrait painter in England until his death.
In 1688 he was made Principal Painter to the King and was knighted in 1692 and a made a baronet in 1715.

SIZE:32.75 x 28 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: Old Nottinghamshire Private Collection.





Ref: 8941
This item has been sold





Portrait of Lady Dorothy Spencer, c.1655; Circle of Sir Peter Lely.
Oil on canvas in a 19th century gilt frame (some small damages to frame).

A charming, insightful portrait of a young girl thought to be Lady Dorothy Spencer. A portrait of this small size was an intimate item, possibly for her parents, and would have been in a private room, rather than a state room.
The unknown artist was strongly influenced by the fashionable Court painter Sir Peter Lely. The intimate quality of this lovely little portrait is enhanced by the rapid, loose treatment of the hair...a painterly enjoyment in the use of the medium.

LADY DOROTHY SPENCER (1640-1670) born at Althorpe, was the daughter of Henry Spencer, 1st Earl of Sunderland; her mother was the former Lady Dorothy Sidney. She was sister of Robert Spencer, 2nd Earl of Sunderland, Penelope Spencer and Henry Spencer. She was also an ancestress of Lady Diana Spencer, Princess of Wales (1961-1997).

Lady Dorothy married George Savile, 1st Viscount Halifax in 1656 becoming the Viscountess of Halifax.
They had two children, William Savile, 2nd Marquess of Halifax, and Anne Savile, later Countess of Carberry. In 1667 George Savile was created Viscount Halifax, but his elevation to the title of Marquess of Halifax came some years after Dorothy's death at the age of 30. She died in London, but is buried in Thornhill, Yorkshire.

SIZE: 20.5 x 17.75 inches inc. frame. Canvas size 13 x 10 inches.
PROVENANCE: Long established London Private Collection.
Ref: 9008
This item has been sold





Portrait of Lady Elizabeth Felton (?). c. 1680; Studio or Circle of Sir Peter Lely.
Oil on canvas in richly carved period frame.

The sitter, possibly Lady Elizabeth Felton, (nee Howard) (1656-1681) looks out at the viewer...her head tilted provocatively and her chemise pulled partly out of her dress. The image is charged with an eroticism that was typical of Elizabeth.
Lady Elizabeth Howard was the daughter of James Howard, 3rd Earl of Suffolk and Barbara Villiers.
She was considered a great beauty in her day and had become notorious at the Restoration Court by the time of her sudden death in 1681 aged 25.

At the age of 19 she had married Thomas Felton, a Groom of the Bedchamber to Charles II, against the wishes of her parents; Elizabeth then proceeded to engage in a series of extra-marital affairs, notable even at the promiscuous Carolean court.
Amongst her lovers were the infamous rake and poet, John Wilmot, Earl of Rochester and Charles II's illegitimate son James, Duke of Monmouth.

SIR PETER LELY (1618 - 1680) was the most important portraitist in the reign of Charles ll, although he had painted portraits throughout the Commonwealth. Principal Painter to the King, he painted everyone of importance, maintaining a busy and active Studio to help with the huge demand for his portraits. Members of his Circle, and his Followers, many of them talented artists in their own right, emulated his style to supply this constant market.

SIZE: 35 x 29 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: inscription verso:-
'Rev'd HA GOODWIN, Corpus Xti College, Cambridge.
Gertrude Goodwin.
Leslie Goodwin.
Christopher John Hughes.
(GOODWIN TRUST)'

The Rev. H.A. Goodwin of Watton House, Norfolk, Fellow of Corpus Christi College, married Katherine Susan, 2nd daughter of J.G. Crosse Esq, M.D. of Norwich on 16 February 1850.

Ref: 8667
This item has been sold





Portrait of Lady Elizabeth Southwell (nee Cromwell) c. 1680; Circle of Sir Godfrey Kneller.
Oil on canvas in gilt cassetta frame.
An intimate small portrait of the young Elizabeth.
Lady Elizabeth Cromwell (c.1672-1709) was the only daughter of Vere Essex Cromwell of Oakham, 4th Earl of Ardglass and his wife Catherine Hamilton.
When her father died in 1687, she claimed the title of 8th Baroness Cromwell of Oakham, although his Earldom and Viscountship became extinct; she was ranked with the Peeresses at the funeral of Queen Mary II and the coronation of Queen Anne, but her claim appears to have been a mistake.
Whether she was entitled to succeed her father depends on how the barony was created. A barony by writ descends to an only daughter, if a baron has no sons; a barony by patent follows the rule of descent given in the patent - normally to the male heirs of the grantee, which would exclude daughters.
The Barony of Cromwell has a patent, granted in 1540 to Gregory Cromwell, 1st Baron Cromwell of Oakham (and his heirs male), son of Henry VIII's Minister Thomas Cromwell, after his father's fall and execution. But the antiquarian William Dugdale had claimed in the 1670s that there was also a writ summoning Gregory Cromwell as Baron Cromwell, dated 28 May 1539. Although he gives a text of the writ, the form is not standard, and no writs at all are recorded as being issued on that day - the first day of Parliament, and so rather late to summon men to attend it; the Complete Peerage conjectures that Dugdale saw a reference to Lord Cromwell in the proceedings of the Parliament, deduced that it meant the son - not the father - and supplied the writ he assumed must exist.
Elizabeth married Edward Southwell, Secretary of State for Ireland, in 1703, a year after the death of his father, Sir Robert Southwell; their son Edward Southwell did not call himself Baron Cromwell of Oakham. Her grandson inherited the much older and more distinguished Barony of Clifford as its 20th holder.
(The fourth image is of Lady Southwell in later life).
SIR GODFREY KNELLER (1646-1723) was the most distinguished painter of baroque portraits in England.
Born in Lubeck, he trained with Bol and Rembrandt, coming to London in 1676.
By 1679 he had painted the King and remained the most famous and successful portrait painter in England until his death.
n 1688 he was made Principal Painter to the King and was knighted in 1692 and a made a baronet in 1715.
His style had a profound influence on British portraiture and a large number of artists, many very talented in their own right, emulated his fashionable style.
SIZE: 19 x 15.75 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE:
*Private Collection, Devon.
*With Roy Precious Fine Art.
*Private Collection, Sussex.
VERSO: indistinct inscription on the stretcher "Lady Southwell By ........"
Ref: 8889
This item has been sold





Portrait of Lady Jane Hyde, Countess of Clarendon c.1693, by Michael Dahl.
Oil on canvas in carved and giltwood frame. The canvas bearing a later inscription.

LADY JANE HYDE (c.1672-1725) eldest daughter of the fourth Earl of Clarendon, married William Campbell, 3rd Earl of Essex. This painting by the Swedish born artist, Michael Dahl, relates to the portrait of Jane Hyde, Countess of Clarendon and Rochester in the Clarendon collection.

Our portrait captures superbly the beauty for which the sitter was renowned.
It is a fine example of Dahl's eloquent depiction of aristocratic women, and reveals why, at his best, he was capable of outshining such contempories as Kneller, Richardson and Seeman. In terms of both draughtmanship and pose, Dahl's female portraits are noticeably softer and gentler than Kneller's, and thus allow for a greater versatility in the expression of feminine beauty.
Dahl's works are frequently distinguished by a greater attention to the character of the sitter than those of his rivals, and he particularly allowed a softer aspect to the surfaces of his sitter's costume and drapery. His colours are silvered and luminous, and there is a great charm and sensitivity in the overall expression of the sitter. In this example, the drapery and sitter's turned head impact a subtle sense of movement. She wears the dark headcloth often seen in Dahl's portraits at this period. Jane was celebrated in verse by her kinsman George Granville, Lord Lansdown, who wrote that the painter "must have search'd the skies/To match the lustre of her eyes". Swift calls her "my mistress" in a letter to the poet John Gay, and also states that she "was long my princpal goddess". Prior wrote of her:
"Majestically fair,/The sparkling eye, and look serene,/The gay and easy air." Alexander Pope praised her in order to make Martha Blount jealous.

The sitter was one of the two daughters of Sir William Leveson-Gower and his wife, Jane, daughter of John Granville, Earl of Bath. She was married, 2 March 1691/2 to Henry, Lord Hyde, eldest son of Laurence, 1st Earl if Rochester. He was for a time joint Vice Treasurer for Ireland, a post which enjoyed an annual pension of some £4,000. In 1711 he succeeded to the earldom of Rochester, and in 1724 to that of Clarendon, both of which titles became extinct on his death in 1753.
At the time of their marriage Lord and Lady Hyde were described as a singularly fine couple and two of their daughters were renowned for their beauty. However, even their looks were considered inferior to those of their mother.


MICHAEL DAHL (1659-1743) was a painter of exceptional talent and regarded as the only really serious rival to Sir Godfrey Kneller, for royal patronage, during the years 1690-1714. Dahl's patterns were undoubtedly indebted to the fashion set by Kneller, but Dahl had a lighter palette, and his brushwork applied in shorter and more careful strokes.
His self portrait hangs in the National Portrait Gallery and he is famed for having painted a series of wonderful female portraits for the Duke of Somerset, now at Petworth House, and known as the Petworth Beauties.
Dahl's portraits of members of the royal family hang at Kensington Palace and Windsor and other examples of his work can be found at the Tate and National Maritime Museum, Greenwich.

SIZE: 37 x 32.5 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE:
* Collection of Hilda Holden Betts.
*Old handwritten label (now in an envelope) with much information and "Picture bought by John's great grandfather c.1850."

Ref: 8696
This item has been sold





Portrait of Lady Mary Montgomerie c.1666; Attributed to John Hayls
Oil on canvas in period giltwood frame.

LADY MARY MONTGOMERIE was the daughter of Hugh Montgomerie, 7th Earl of Eglinton and Lady Mary Leslie.
The title of Earl of Eglinton has been held by the famous Scotish family of Montgomerie since 1508. The Earl of Eglinton is Hereditary Clan Chief of Clan Montgomerie.

Lady Mary was married in 1662 to George, 4th Earl of Winton, thus becoming the Countess of Winton. The marriage feast was held at her father's house in the West Country on 4 September 1662.
Lady Mary had one daughter, also Lady Mary, who died aged three in 1666. The black mourning band decorated with large diamonds almost certainly commemorates the child's untimely death. The Countess of Winton died in 1677.

(Our thanks to Christopher Sheppard, a descendant of the Earls of Wintour, for his help in research).

JOHN HAYLS (Hales) (fl.1651-1679) was a portrait painter who studied under Miereveldt. He was a competitor of Lely and painted in the manner of Van Dyck, also being an excellent copyist of his portraits.
In 1666 Samuel Pepys, the famous diarist and Commissioner for the Royal Navy, had his and his wife Elizabeth's portraits painted by Hayls. Of the paintings he wrote:- "I am still infinitely pleased with my wife's picture. I paid him £14 for it, and 25s for the frame, and I think it is not a whit too dear for so good a picture. It is not yet quite finished and dry, so as to be fit to bring home yet. This day I begin to sit, and he will make me, I think, a very fine picture. He promises it shall be as good as my wife's."
Hayls died in Bloomsbury and is buried in St. Martin's Church.

SIZE: 43 x 34 inches inc. frame.

PROVENANCE: By descent to the 14th Earl of Kintore of Keith Hall, Aberdenshire. Verso: old inventory label "The Earl of Kintore. No. 53 on Oct. '83 valuation".
(The fourth photograph shows Keith Hall as it is today.)
Ref: 8507
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Portrait of Lady Mary Villiers 17th c., after van Dyck.
Oil on canvas in good quality 18th century carved and giltwood frame.

LADY MARY VILLIERS, Lady Herbert and later Duchess of Lennox and Richmond (1622 – 1685), as St Agnes, after Sir Anthony Van Dyck (1599-1641).

The original portrait by Sir Anthony van Dyck is life size and in the Royal Collection. "A number of copies of this portrait survive, some indicating that the original version was once larger in size." quote from'Van Dyck in Britain', edited by Karen Sharpe, published by the Tate.
This is one of those, and the sitter fits within the composition much more comfortably than the now tightly cropped original.

The original painting, in the Royal Collection, Windsor, was presumably painted for Charles I, who gave the sitter away at her wedding in 1637 to the Duke of Lennox. She is shown as St Agnes, the patroness of those engaged to be married.
St Agnes is usually accompanied by a lamb, because of the similarity of her name to the Latin agnus, a lamb, but actually ‘Agnes’ comes from the Greek word for ‘chaste’.

Lady Mary Villiers was the daughter of 1st Duke of Buckingham and Katherine Manners and, raised with the royal children, she was a favourite of James I and Charles I. She was married three times.
In 1626 she was betrothed to Charles Herbert, son of Philip, who subsequently succeeded as 4th Earl of Pembroke. They were married on 8 January 1635, but Herbert died a year later, leaving a 13 year-old widow. Her second marriage was to James Stuart, Duke of Lennox (afterwards Duke of Richmond), a cousin of Charles I, on 3 August 1637. Whilst living at King Charles I exiled court at Oxford between 1643 and 1645, Mary was rumoured to have had an affair with Prince Rupert of the Rhine.
The Duke of Richmond died in 1655, and Mary left for the exiled Royalist community in Paris. After the Restoration she returned to the English Court and became Lady of the Bedchamber to the dowager Queen, Henrietta Maria. In 1664 she was married to Colonel Thomas Howard (d. 1678), brother of 1st Earl of Carlisle.

As Duchess of Richmond, and later as the wife of Colonel Howard, Lady Mary was a prominent figure at Court after the Restoration. Several poems by the anonymous Stuart poetess known as Ephelia (whose works were published in 1679 as ''Female Poems... by Ephelia'') were dedicated to her, and it has been established in the last decade by Maureen Mulvihill of the Princeton Research Forum that Ephelia was in fact Lady Mary herself. This poetess produced an intriguing set of texts, some privately-printed, being bold political broadsheets against the Popish Plot and the rising of James, Duke of Monmouth, as well as amusing coterie verse, songs, a collection of female poems, amorous verse-letters, and ‘a damn'd play’, evidently a farce-burlesque on the debauched private lives of Charles II and his brother, James, Duke of York. This new identification suggests that Lady Mary Villiers was the most highly-placed, publishing woman writer of the Stuart period.
She died in 1685 and was buried in Westminster Abbey.

SIR ANTHONY VAN DYKE (1599-1641) was the greatest master of the European baroque portrait. Born in Antwerp, he first visited England in 1620. In 1632 he entered the service of King Charles I as Court Painter, and was knighted in 1633.
His clientele was essentially the aristocratic circle of courtiers, many of whom lived in a romantic Royalist dream world which collapsed in ruins in the Civil War, soon after Van Dyck's death.
Van Dyke's influence on the art of the portrait is almost beyond measure.

SIZE: 36 x 31 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: Old Collection, Gloucestershire country house.
Ref: 8849
This item has been sold





Portrait of Lady Mary Villiers C.1640; Attributed to Theodore Russell.
Oil on panel in gilded frame.
This is a superb quality portrait in fine condition. The elaborate frame is in the French style and presents this lovely portrait like a jewel in a rich gold setting.
A reduced version of Van Dyck's original. These small size portraits after Van Dyck were the speciality of Russell and of Van Leemput.

LADY MARY VILLIERS was the daughter of 1st Duke of Buckingham and Katherine Manners and, raised with the royal children, she was a favourite of James I and Charles I. She was married three times.
In 1626 she was betrothed to Charles Herbert, son of Philip, who subsequently succeeded as 4th Earl of Pembroke. They were married on 8 January 1635, but Herbert died a year later, leaving a 13 year-old widow. Her second marriage was to James Stuart, Duke of Lennox (afterwards Duke of Richmond), a cousin of Charles I, on 3 August 1637. Whilst living at King Charles I exiled court at Oxford between 1643 and 1645, Mary was rumoured to have had an affair with Prince Rupert of the Rhine.
The Duke of Richmond died in 1655, and Mary left for the exiled Royalist community in Paris. After the Restoration she returned to the English Court and became Lady of the Bedchamber to the dowager Queen, Henrietta Maria. In 1664 she was married to Colonel Thomas Howard (d. 1678), brother of 1st Earl of Carlisle.

As Duchess of Richmond, and later as the wife of Colonel Howard, Lady Mary was a prominent figure at Court after the Restoration. Several poems by the anonymous Stuart poetess known as Ephelia (whose works were published in 1679 as ''Female Poems... by Ephelia'') were dedicated to her, and it has been established in the last decade by Maureen Mulvihill of the Princeton Research Forum that Ephelia was in fact Lady Mary herself. This poetess produced an intriguing set of texts, some privately-printed, being bold political broadsheets against the Popish Plot and the rising of James, Duke of Monmouth, as well as amusing coterie verse, songs, a collection of female poems, amorous verse-letters, and ‘a damn'd play’, evidently a farce-burlesque on the debauched private lives of Charles II and his brother, James, Duke of York. This new identification suggests that Lady Mary Villiers was the most highly-placed, publishing woman writer of the Stuart period.
She died in 1685 and was buried in Westminster Abbey.

THEODORE RUSSELL (1614-1689)
Aliases: Theodore Rousel; Theodore Rousseel; Theodore Roussel; Theodore Russel.
Born in London, his father, Nicasius, was a goldsmith and jeweller, who left Bruges for England about 1573 and settled in the parish of St Anne, Blackfriars, London; his second wife, Theodore’s mother, was the sister of Cornelis Jonson van Ceulen.
The Russells were connected with the Gheeraerts, de Critz and Oliver families. Theodore’s son, Anthony Russell, who provided George Vertue with information concerning 17th-century artists, stated that Theodore had studied under Jonson and van Dyck, who much influenced his style. he had been employed by such patrons as the 3rd Earl of Essex and the 1st Earl of Holland, and ‘was a lover of ease & his Bottle’.

SIZE: Panel, 15.5 x 12.5 inches
Frame: 25.5 x 21 inches
PROVENANCE:
*Old collection of a titled family, North Yorkshire.
*With Roy Precious Fine Art.
*Collection of a Fellow of a Cambridge College.
Ref: 9015
This item has been sold





Portrait of Louise de Keroualle, Duchess of Portsmouth c.1671; by Mary Beale.
Oil on canvas in a later frame (damages).

The Duchess lounges sensously on the ground, in an Arcadian landscape....she holds a shepherd's crook, a lamb by her side. This is possibly the first time Lely used this pose which he was to use many times.
Louise demonstrates her new status amongst the most elevated at Court by wearing a daring 'undress'...this was a means of demonstrating one's superiority.

LOUISE DE KEROUALLE, DUCHESS OF PORTSMOUTH
She was highly successful in her career as a mistress, and as an agent in the interest of King Louis XIV. She had first come to England in 1670 as a Maid of Honour to the Duchess of Orleans, the King’s sister. When the Duchess died in that year, Louis sent her back to England in order to captivate the King, whose mistress she became in the following year. She was the most absolute of the mistresses, and remained with the King until his death. Charles’s obligation to Louis was considerable — he received a pension from the French king in consequence of the Secret Treaty of 1670 — and neither this money nor Louise de Kerouaille let him forget it. In 1674 she was created Baroness Petersfield, Countess of Fareham and Duchess of Portsmouth.

Her conduct of her position was highly accomplished, and she ensured amid moments of strong anti-Catholic feeling, such as the Popish Plot, that she was friends not only with the Duke of York, as might be expected, but with the Earl of Shaftesbury, the Prince of Orange and the Duke of Monmouth. At the King’s death she lived in England until 1688, when returned to France. She spent the rest of her life in considerable financial difficulties, having spent the fortune that she received from Charles on gambling and extravagance. She was the longest-lived of the mistresses, dying in France in 1734. The Dukes of Richmond are descended from her.

MARY BEALE 1632-1697.
Beale's oeuvre is best-known for its scale-of-life portraits of her friends and contemporaries. Works such as the present painting represent a third and further aspect of her work, in which she produced copies of paintings by Sir Peter Lely with a mind both to an understanding of his technique as well as to the marketablity of the product.

This portrait of the Duchess of Portsmouth belongs to a particular category of these copies, which are distinguished by a reduction in scale and by the employment of a more meticulous technique and often costlier pigments than found in her larger canvasses. The present portrait, a ''pin-up'' of a current Royal mistress, is plainly of a commercial subject, and would have justified the comparatively high price of its execution -perhaps as much as £11.
The original was commissioned by Robert Spencer, 2nd Earl of Sunderland in 1671 and is still at Althorp. This painting might have been painted by Mary Beale from Lely's original before its collection by the client, or, according to a further theory concerning these small pictures, from the client's painting as a duplicate to hang in a townhouse whilst the large paintings went to the country.

Following the Windsor Beauties series, there was a great fashion in the second half of the seventeenth century in the collection of portraits of prominent women famous for their beauty and scandalous behaviour. As well as the eleven portraits listed in 1674 from the Windsor Series there were other recorded sets, most prominent among them belonging to Robert Spencer, 2nd Earl of Sunderland.

SIZE:32.5 x 27.25 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: Private Collection for many years.
Ref: 8837
This item has been sold



 
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