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SOLD ITEMS
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SOLD....Portrait of Nicholas Fortescue,1627; English School
Oil on canvas in a period 'cassetta' frame.

Portrait of Nicholas Fortescue, aged 31, three quarter length in a brown slashed doublet, white lace collar and cuffs, with sword and arquebus support. The sitter wears the metal gorget of an officer which contrasts with the very expensive 'reticella' lace he also wears.

The arquebus (sometimes spelled harquebus or hackbut) was a primitive firearm used in the 15th to 17th centuries. Like its successor, the musket, it was a smoothbore firearm although somewhat smaller than its predecessors, which made it easier to carry.The arquebus was fired by a matchlock mechanism and the arquebusier supported the gun's barrel with a pole with a forked end when firing.

Fortescue was born in East Allington in 1596; his father was Edmund Fortescue, born 1552, and his mother, Mary (Maria) Champernoune, born 1567.
Their ancestor Sir Richard le Fort came to England with William the Conqueror and was given the name Fort Escue (strong shield) through having protected Duke William with his shield at the Battle of Hastings in 1066.

The family resided at East Allington in South Devon for many generations; their arms are displayed in the village church of St. Andrew.

SIZE: 38 x 35.5 inches inc. frame.

PROVENANCE: By descent through the Fortescue family to the late Mrs Charles Steuart.
Then to a private collection in an East Anglian
Georgian country house.

With the portrait comes a printout of the the Fortescue family tree from the Norman Conquest to the mid 17th century. Extracted from 'The Visitations of the County of Devon' by Lt. Col. J.L. Vivian, 1895.

Ref: 8537a
This item has been sold





SOLD....Portrait of Princess Henrietta Anne c.1662; Studio of Lely, possibly John Baptist Gaspars
Oil on canvas mounted on board in a carved and gilded 17th century style frame.
A fine portrait of Henrietta Anne Stuart very similar, but reversed, to Lely's 1662 portrait in the National Portrait Gallery.

HENRIETTA ANNE STUART, Duchesse d'Orléans, third daughter of the English king, Charles I and his queen, Henrietta Maria, was born during the Civil War at Exeter on the 16th of June 1644. A few days after her birth her mother left England, and provision for her maintenance having been made by Charles she lived at Exeter under the care of Lady Dalkeith (afterwards Countess of Morton) until the surrender of the city to the Parliamentarians, when she was taken to Oatlands in Surrey.
In July 1646 Lady Dalkeith carried the princess in disguise to France, and she rejoined her mother in Paris, where her girlhood was spent and where she was educated as a Roman Catholic. Henrietta was present at the coronation of Louis XIV, and was mentioned as a possible bride for the king, but she was betrothed, not to Louis, but to his only brother Philippe.

After the restoration of her brother Charles II, she returned to England with her mother, but a few months later she was again in Paris, where she was married to Philippe, now Duke of Orleans, on the 30th of March 1661. The duchess was very popular at the court of Louis XIV, and was on good terms with the grand monarch himself; she shared in the knowledge of state secrets, but was soon estranged from her husband.
A year into the marriage, Henrietta gave birth to a daughter later baptised Marie Louise. The paternity of the child was doubted by the court who believed Louis XIV, or the Count of Guiche, to be the father. Henriette and Guiche had started an affair early in her marriage, despite his having been a former lover of Philippe.

In 1670, at the instigation of Louis, she visited England and obtained the signature of Charles II's ministers to the treaty of Dover; her success in this matter greatly delighted Louis, but it did not improve her relations with Philippe, who had long refused his consent to his wife's visit to England.
Shortly after returning to France, Henrietta died at St. Cloud on the 30th of June 1670. She was buried at St. Denis, her funeral oration being pronounced by her friend Bossuet, and it was asserted that she had been poisoned by order of her husband.

She left two daughters, Marie Louise, wife of Charles II of Spain, and Anne Marie, wife of Victor Amadeus II of Savoy. According to legitimist principles, the descendants of Henrietta, through her daughter Marie of Savoy, are entitled to wear the British crown.

JOHN BAPTIST GASPARS (working c.1641-1692). He was a portraitist and all-purpose painter; chiefly known for having painted "postures" for Sir Peter Lely, Court and Society portraitist, Riley and Kneller. He was a native of Antwerp and son of a painter; he was made Master at Antwerp in 1641/2.
Gaspars was in England by 1650 where he entered the service of General Lambert whom he taught to paint. From c.1660 he was a leading executant in Lely's studio, but was also allowed to work on his own.

SIZE: 32 x 25.5 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: For the last 34 years in a private collection in Switzerland and then Sussex, England.
Ref: 8601
This item has been sold





SOLD....Portrait of Queen Anne c.1705; Circle of Dahl
Oil on canvas in a superb carved and giltwood frame.

QUEEN ANNE (1665-1714). The second daughter of James II, Anne married Prince George of Denmark in 1683, and succeeded William III to the throne in 1702. For the whole of her reign, which was a period of great glory, this kind and generous woman was surrounded by warring political factions.
In her personal life she suffered greatly, all her many children dying in infancy. Only Prince William lived longer than the others, and his death aged eleven opened up the Hanoverian succession.

In this elegant portrait, an exquisite version 'in little' of a life-size Court painting, she is shown as queen, draped in her robes of state and with her crown by her side.

MICHAEL DAHL (1659-1743) was born in Stockholm; after studying in Paris, Rome and Frankfurt he settled in London in 1689. He soon became the best patronised portrait painter in England after Kneller. He was much employed at the Court painting many portraits.

His style is extremely close to Kneller but his interpretation of character is less brash and more human. He has a quieter but somehow more understanding appeal to character which relies on its own integrity to make its impact; his works are of a real distinction.
At his best he was a finer portraitist than any of his contemporaries, with a softer and more gentle technique than Kneller's, which was especially suitable for his portraits of women.

SIZE: 17 x 12 inches canvas size.
24.5 x 19 inches frame size.

PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Yorkshire.
Ref: 8469
This item has been sold





SOLD....Portrait of Queen Henrietta Maria c.1635; Attributed to Theodore Russell.
Oil on panel in gilded frame.

This is a superb quality portrait in fine condition. The elaborate frame is in the French style and presents this lovely portrait like a jewel in a rich gold setting.

HENRIETTA MARIA of France (1609 – 1669) was the Queen consort of England, Scotland and Ireland as the wife of King Charles I. She was mother of two kings, Charles II and James II and grandmother of two queens and one king, Mary II, William III and Anne of Great Britain as well as paternal aunt of Louis XIV of France.

Her Catholic religion made her unpopular in England, and also prohibited her from being crowned in an Anglican service; therefore she never had a coronation. She began to immerse herself in national affairs as civil war loomed on the horizon, when the English Civil War began in 1642, Henrietta Maria was in Europe.
She returned to England in 1643 when she landed in Yorkshire with troops. She joined up with Royalist forces in the north and made her headquarters in York. She moved to Oxford to be with Charles but fled to France in July 1644 following the birth of her youngest daughter, Henrietta Anne when the position of the Royalists looked bleak; here she remained along with her sons.

Her husband's execution in 1649 was a terrible blow. She brought up her youngest child Henrietta in her own faith, but her efforts to persuade her youngest son, the Duke of Gloucester, to take the same course only produced discomfort in the exiled family.
The story of her marriage with her attached servant Lord Jermyn needs more confirmation than it has yet received to be accepted, but all the information which has reached us of her relations with her children points to the estrangement which had grown up between them.
After the Restoration she returned to England when she found that she had no place in the new world. She received from Parliament a grant of £30,000 a year in compensation for the loss of her dower-lands, and the King added a similar sum as a pension from himself.
In January 1661 she returned to France to be present at the marriage of her daughter Henrietta to the Duke of Orleans.
In July 1662 she set out again for England, and took up her residence once more at Somerset House. Her health failed her, and on the 24th of June 1665, she departed in search of the clearer air of her native country.
She died on the 31st of August 1666, at Colombes, not far from Paris.

THEODORE RUSSELL (1614-1689)
Aliases: Theodore Rousel; Theodore Rousseel; Theodore Roussel; Theodore Russel.
Born in London, his father, Nicasius, was a goldsmith and jeweller, who left Bruges for England about 1573 and settled in the parish of St Anne, Blackfriars, London; his second wife, Theodore’s mother, was the sister of Cornelis Jonson van Ceulen.
The Russells were connected with the Gheeraerts, de Critz and Oliver families. Theodore’s son, Anthony Russell, who provided George Vertue with information concerning 17th-century artists, stated that Theodore had studied under Jonson and van Dyck, who much influenced his style. he had been employed by such patrons as the 3rd Earl of Essex and the 1st Earl of Holland, and ‘was a lover of ease & his Bottle’.

SIZE: 15.5 x 12.5 inches, panel.
25.5 x 21 inches frame.
PROVENANCE: Collection of a Titled Family, Yorkshire Dales. (The portraits 8702 and 8703 came from the same collection).
Ref: 8701
This item has been sold





SOLD....Portrait of Queen Henrietta Maria, After Sir Anthony Van Dyck.
A fine oil on canvas of the queen of Charles I, copied in 1845 from the painting at Blenheim Palace.
The prime version of this portrait, painted in 1632, and the first portrait of Henrietta Maria by the great artist Anthony Van Dyck is in the Royal Collection. It originally hung in the King's Bedchamber in Whitehall Palace. King Charles authorised a payment of £20 for this painting 'of our royall Consort’.
Another 19th century copy is in the collection of the Duke of Norfolk at Arundel Castle.
The artist William Smith is probably the London based W. Smith, working from 1830 to 1851, who was a portraitist and exhibited nine works at the Royal Academy.

HENRIETTA MARIA of France (1609 – 1669) was the Queen Consort of England, Scotland and Ireland as the wife of King Charles I. She was mother of two kings, Charles II and James II and grandmother of two queens and one king, Mary II, William III and Anne of Great Britain as well as paternal aunt of Louis XIV of France.

Her Catholic religion made her unpopular in England, and also prohibited her from being crowned in an Anglican service; therefore she never had a coronation. She began to immerse herself in national affairs as civil war loomed on the horizon: when the English Civil War began in 1642, Henrietta Maria was in Europe.
She returned to England in 1643 when she landed in Yorkshire with troops. She joined up with Royalist forces in the north and made her headquarters in York. She moved to Oxford to be with Charles but fled to France in July 1644 following the birth of her youngest daughter, Henrietta Anne, when the position of the Royalists looked bleak; here she remained along with her sons.

Her husband's execution in 1649 was a terrible blow. She brought up her youngest child Henrietta in her own faith, but her efforts to persuade her youngest son, the Duke of Gloucester, to take the same course only produced discomfort in the exiled family.

After the Restoration she returned to England when she found that she had no place in the new world. She received from Parliament a grant of £30,000 a year in compensation for the loss of her dower-lands, and the King added a similar sum as a pension from himself.
In January 1661 she returned to France to be present at the marriage of her daughter Henrietta to the Duke of Orleans.
In July 1662 she set out again for England, and took up her residence once more at Somerset House. Her health failed her, and on the 24th of June 1665, she departed in search of the clearer air of her native country.
She died on the 31st of August 1666, at Colombes, not far from Paris.

SIR ANTHONY VAN DYKE (1599-1641) was the greatest master of the European baroque portrait. Born in Antwerp, he first visited England in 1620. In 1632 he entered the service of King Charles I as Court Painter, and was knighted in 1633.
His clientele was essentially the aristocratic circle of courtiers, many of whom lived in a romantic royalist dream world which collapsed in ruins in the Civil War, soon after Van Dyck's death.
Sir Anthony Van Dyke's influence on the art of the portrait is almost beyond measure.

SIZE: 47 x 37 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: Oxfordshire Private Collection.
Verso: four old labels and three inscriptions. "Copied by permission of Grace the Duke of Marlborough from the original painting by Van Dyck in Blenheim Palace, by William Smith, 1845" and "Drawing Room, No. 10" being among them.
Ref: 8781
This item has been sold





SOLD....Portrait of Robert Rich, 2nd Earl of Warwick c.1630/5; Follower of Daniel Mytens
A small full length portrait, oil on canvas in giltwood frame.
In this elegant portrait, an exquisite version 'in little' of a life-size Court painting, the Earl stands outside a campaign tent wearing his breastplate, his helmet to his left and the rest of his armour to his right.
Of 'cabinet size' the painting has a great theatrical sense, using a combination of drapery and pose. (The 'cabinet' in the 17th century was a small, intimate room in which were kept items important to the owner,and only their closest friends would be admitted).


ROBERT RICH, 2nd Earl of Warwick, 1587-1658.
He was knighted at the coronation of King James I in July 1603 and succeeded as the second Earl of Warwick in March 1619. His inheritance made him one of the most powerful landowners in the kingdom, with extensive estates in Essex and property in London. During the 1620s and '30s, Warwick was active in colonial ventures in New England and the West Indies. He also financed several privateering expeditions against the Spaniards.
He was involved in the colonisation of America, associated with the foundation of New Plymouth, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and later of Rhode Island (1644).
A staunch Puritan, Warwick became increasingly alienated from Court life.

Although he was appointed to the King's Privy Council in April 1641, Warwick was a leading critic of the Earl of Strafford and was active in his prosecution. After King Charles fled from London early in 1642, Parliament appointed Warwick Lord-Lieutenant of Essex.

In March 1642, Parliament appointed Warwick Lord High Admiral against the King's wishes. His appointment was popular in the fleet and ensured Parliament's control of the navy. Under Warwick's command, the navy intercepted ships carrying supplies to the Royalists and supported military operations on land, notably at the siege of Hull in 1643 and Lyme 1644.
At the beginning of the Second Civil War in May 1648, a naval revolt broke out against the appointment of the Leveller Thomas Rainsborough as vice-admiral, and a number of warships defected to the Royalists. Warwick was re-appointed Lord Admiral and sent to ensure the loyalty of the remaining ships. In August 1648, he confronted a Royalist fleet commanded by the Prince of Wales in the shallow waters of the Thames estuary.

In February 1649, Warwick's admiralty commission was revoked. He retired from public life until the establishment of Cromwell's Protectorate with its anti-Spanish foreign policy, of which he approved. In June 1657, Warwick carried the sword of state during Cromwell's second inauguration as Lord-Protector. The following November, his grandson and heir Robert Rich married Cromwell's daughter Frances. Warwick died in April 1658, his death greatly lamented by Cromwell.

Daniël Mijtens (Delft, c. 1590 – The Hague, 1647/48), known in England as DANIEL MYTENS the Elder, was a Dutch portrait painter who spent the central years of his career working in England. He was born in Delft into a family of artists and trained in The Hague, possibly in the studio of Van Mierevelt.

SIZE: 29.5 x 20.25 inches inc. frame
PROVENANCE: Rushbrooke Hall, Suffolk until the
contents sale of 1919.
Nowton Cottage, Suffolk until 2010.

Verso: old label: 'Francis Collins from Great Portland Street. Picture Cleaner to his Royal Highness the Duke of York'


IMAGE 4: Rushbrooke Hall, home to generations of the Jermyn family, was Suffolk's largest and finest moated Tudor mansion. Used for housing troops during the war, it suffered a mysterious fire, and was demolished without permission in 1961. Pevsner called it a capital loss, a tragic disruption of the post-war Suffolk landscape.

IMAGE 5: Nowton Cottage is an eight bedroomed 17th c timber framed house standing in 5 acres.
Ref: 8543
This item has been sold





SOLD....Portrait of Roger Simpinkson c.1760, by Sir George Chalmers.
Oil on canvas in fine carved and giltwood frame.

ROGER SIMPKINSON, born 1732. This may be the Roger Simpinkson who was a successful silversmith who lived in Fleet street, London; he was a member of the local Freemason's Lodge.
Simpinkson married Elizabeth King and in 1766 they had a son, James.

Intriguingly, the sitter holds a cameo ring; at this time a typical Grand Tour ring such as this marked the wearer as a man of culture and discernment.
Below his hand part of a musical score is seen, resting on an expensive and fashionable marble topped stand or table.
The words 'Honor and Arm.......Such a Foe' are visible; this is part of Handel's lyric sung by the giant Harapha in the the oratorio 'Samson' based on Milton's work 'Samson Agonistes' of 1671. Handel's oratorio was premiered at Covent Garden in 1743. "Honor and Arms scorn such a foe" says the giant as he refuses to fight the blinded Samson.
Clearly there is a message here, but what it said and to whom and for what purpose is not known.

SIR GEORGE CHALMERS, (c 1720-1791) was born in Edinburgh. His grandfather, Charles Chalmers, was killed at the battle of Sherriffmuir in 1715, fighting on the side of the Pretender, thus forfeiting the family estates.His father, Roderick, who died in 1746, was Ross Herald to the Lyon Court and a heraldic painter. George studied painting under his father and Alan Ramsay.
In 1751 he went to Rome, where he mixed with the expatriate Jacobites, and he went on from there to Florence and Minorca, where he painted the governor general, Baron William Blakeney. A mezzotint of this painting is in the National Portrait Gallery.

About 1760 George returned to Edinburgh, where he assumed the baronetcy in 1764. Sir George Chalmers became the 4th holder of the title in 1764, on the death of a relative of the same name.
In June 1768, Sir George married Isabella, daughter of the painter John Alexander and sister of his painter friend Cosmo John Alexander (1724-1772), whom George had met in Italy. Sir George and Isabella had one child, also named Isabella, who became a nun. In 1778 they moved from Edinburgh to Hull and from there, in 1784, to London, where Sir George died in 1791

He exhibited 24 works at the Royal Academy between 1775 and 1790.
Sir George’s best known painting is The Captain of the Honourable Company of Edinburgh Golfers William St Clair of Roslin (1771), which now hangs in the hall of the Royal Company of Archers in Edinburgh. Other works are in the National Gallery, the National Portrait Gallery, the National Gallery of Scotland, the Scottish National Portrait Gallery, the City of Edinburgh Collection, and at Drum Castle and Fyvie Castle (National Trust of Scotland).

SIZE: 36 x 31 inches inc. frame.
Old labels verso identifying the sitter.
PROVENANCE: Sussex Private Collection.
Ref: 8675
This item has been sold





SOLD....Portrait of Samuel Tufnell (1682-1758); English School, Follower of Highmore
An interesting portrait of Samuel Tufnell, an early Georgian country gentleman. This portrait comes with a copy of the book "Samuel Tufnell of Langleys 1682-1758; the Life and Times of an Essex Squire" by Francis W. Steer.

"At Great Waltham in the centre of Essex is the mellow brick mansion of Langleys where, over the dining room fireplace hangs the portrait of a grave-faced boy in a red coat. Two miles away, at Pleshey - a place known to all readers of Shakespeare - is a massive marble monument with the bust of an old man who died full of years and achievements.
The boy and the man are one. The portrait and the bust are both of Samuel Tufnell who bought Langleys and made it into the stately home we see today.
As a landowner, he took no small part in the affairs of the county of his adoption; he served his country too in positions requiring tact and shrewd judgement.
The object of this book is to give a picture of the life and times of a country gentleman during the first half of the eighteenth century, the period of William of Orange, Queen Anne, and the first two Georges."

So begins this illuminating insight into a way of life long gone, which with the portrait, makes us feel we really know the man and his times.

The portrait itself is a good, honest, no-nonsense image of the sitter...he looks directly and frankly at the viewer. The unknown artist was clearly influenced by the work of Joseph Highmore (1692 – 1780), an artist very fashionable with the gentry at this time.
The frame is a good example of 18th century carved giltwood.

SIZE: 36 x 30.5 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: Sir Robert Wilmot Horton.
Yorkshire Private Collection.

Verso, Victorian Gothic script label: "Painting of Samuel Tufnell, esquire, of Langleys, married Elizabeth, daughter of George Cressener. The property of Sir Robert Wilmot-Horton; Artist J. Highmore."

(It has been suggested by a member of the family that this may not be Samuel Tufnell, but his grandson, also called Samuel Tufnell, who married the daughter of Wilmot-Horton).

See image 5 for Langleys as it is today.

Ref: 8555
This item has been sold





SOLD....Portrait of Sandford Tatham c.1765/70: English School
Oil on canvas in period part gilt frame.

The young Sandford Tatham, son of a Cumberland clergyman, aged about ten or twelve, looks out at the viewer with a half smile as he gestures towards his pet squirrel.
The artist is an unknown English provincial painter but he has managed to capture the youthful freshness of the young boy. The portrait has a real charm and a quality of intimacy.

SANDFORD TATHAM (1755-1840) was commissioned as a lieutenant in the Royal Navy in December 1776 at the age of 21. He was appointed Commander in September 1790 and was commissioned Captain in November 1794. His commands were HMS Argo and HMS Dromedary. In 1794 the Dromedary sailed with the fleet of Sir John Jervis from Barbados to Martinique for an assault on the French and later that year, still under Sandford's command, took part in operations at the islands of Martinique, St. Lucia and Guadaloupe.
Sandford retired as Superannuated Rear Admiral in December 1813.
His wife was a member of the Davison family from the Durham area.

In 1830, in a celebrated court case, Admiral Tatham laid claim to the historic Hornby Castle against a distant cousin, the Rev. Anthony Lister of Gargrave, Yorkshire. Four trials were held in 1830, 1833, 1834 and 1836; the verdict was for Tatham and a similar decision was made in the Queen's bench and was finally confirmed by the House of Lords in 1838.
The admiral died at Hornby Castle in 1840, aged 85, his wife died in 1842.
A brass set in the floor of St. Margaret's Church,Hornby commemorates Tatham and two fine funeral hatchments painted with the Tatham and Davison coats of arms hang on the walls.
(Image 5 shows Hornby Castle)

SIZE: 32 x 27 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Gloucestershire.

VERSO: old pencil inscription on stretcher 'Admiral Tatham of Hornby Castle'
Ref: 8627
This item has been sold





SOLD....Portrait of Sir Hugh Cholmley c.1684; Attributed to Thomas Murray
Oil on canvas in fine quality 17th c. carved and giltwood oakleaf frame, bearing label "Hugh Cholmley of West Newton Grange. 16*4. Thomas Murray".

SIR HUGH CHOLMLEY (Cholmeley) 4th Bt. {1632-1690} of West Newton Grange, Yorkshire.
Born at Fyling Hall, near Whitby, Yorkshire, he was the son of Sir Hugh Cholmley, 1st Bt. and Elizabeth Twysden.

[ Sir Hugh, the first baronet, was born in 1600 in Roxby, Yorkshire. During the Civil War in 1643, as a general, he fought for Parliament before transfering his allegiance to the Royalist cause and became Governor of Scarborough Castle.]

The sitter in this portrait, Sir Hugh Cholmley, 4th Bt., married Lady Anne Compton, daughter of Spencer Compton, 2nd Earl of Northampton and Lady Mary Beaumont in 1665/6 at Hamerton, Huntingdonshire. He held the office of Governor of Tangiers, Morocco in 1665, succeeding to the baronetcy in July 1665. He was M.P. for Northampton in 1679, and M.P. for Thirsk from 1685 to 1687. He died, aged 56, at Whitby, Yorkshire.

THOMAS MURRAY (1663-1735). Born perhaps in Scotland, he was a pupil of Riley, but his better portraits, those before 1700, are very much like Closterman. He was very successful; he died rich in London in 1735.

SIZE: 38 x 33 inches inc. frame.

PROVENANCE: by descent to Piers Henry Augustus Butler, 16th Viscount Mountgarret died 1966; sold by his Will Chattels Trust in December 2010.
Prior to the sale the portrait was on long term loan to Bradford Corporation Art Gallery.

Tong Hall was one of the Tempest family's properties for 400 years until 1941.
Sir John Tempest, 1st Bt, born 1645, married Henrietta Cholmley of West Newton Grange, daughter of the sitter in this portrait, in c.1663/4.
The 13th Viscount Mountgarret married Francis Penelope Plumbe-Tempest of Tong Hall in 1844; thus the portrait of Sir Hugh Cholmley was acquired by the Mountgarrets.

VERSO: old printed label:-
"City of Bradford Corporation Art Gallery.
Cartwright Memorial Hall.
TONG HALL.
Loan number 188."

Indistinct 19th c. handwritten label:-
"**** Tempest, ***** of Ann Tempest of Tong
by Mary Tempest of Broughton(?)"



Ref: 8552
This item has been sold



 
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