Portrait of Ernst Casimir, Count of Nassau-Dietz, ...

Item Ref
9233

Oil on panel.

This 17th century portrait is based on the main version by Wybrand de Geest in the Rijksmuseum, which is 78 x 51 inches; this superb painting is a rather more manageable 24 x 17 inches.

ERNST CASIMIR I (22 December 1573 – 2 June 1632) was a Count of Nassau-Dietz and Stadtholder of Friesland, Groningen and Drenthe. He was the 11th child of John VI, Count of Nassau-Dillenburg, and Countess Elisabeth of Leuchtenberg. After the death of his father, his counties Nassau-Dillenburg, Nassau-Siegen, Nassau-Dietz, and Vianden were divided among his five living sons. Ernest Casimir followed him as Count of Nassau-Dietz. In 1631, he inherited the small county of Spiegelberg near Lauenstein.

Ernest Casimir was primarily known as an outstanding military leader during the Eighty Years' War. He served under Maurice of Nassau, Prince of Orange, in the siege of the cities of Steenwijk and Oldenzaal, and Frederick Henry, Prince of Orange, during the Siege of Groenlo and the Siege of 's-Hertogenbosch. As Stadtholder of Groningen, he founded the Nieuweschans fortress in 1628. Although he owned little in Friesland, he was popular there, and people granted his heir the right to rule after his death.

He was killed by a bullet at the siege of Roermond while he was inspecting the trenches in June 1632. His son, Henry Casimir I, succeeded him as count of Nassau-Dietz and as Stadtholder of Friesland, Groningen and Drenthe.

WYBRAND SIMONSZ. DE GEEST (16 August 1592 – c. 1661) was a Dutch Golden Age portrait painter from Friesland. He was born and died at Leeuwarden. He learned painting from his father, Simon Juckesz, a stained glass worker. He studied later with Abraham Bloemaert. From 1614 to 1618 he travelled in France and Italy on a Grand Tour. In 1616 he met up with Leonard Bramer in Aix-en-Provence. While in Rome he became a member of the painters' circle known as the Bentvueghels. He earned the nickname 'De Friesche Adelaar', or "the Frisian Eagle".

De Geest married Hendrickje Fransdr Uylenburgh in 1622, a niece of Saskia van Uylenburgh, the wife of Rembrandt. In 1634, just before his own marriage, Rembrandt visited De Geest's studio. In 1636 the Frenchman Charles Ogier, secretary to Cardinal Richelieu visited De Geest, to view his large collection of curiosities and coins.
De Geest was the most important portrait painter of Friesland and painted numerous portraits of the well-to-do citizens of his day, many of which survive in the Fries Museum. Perhaps the most intimate portraits he painted were those of his direct family. De Geest influenced Jacob Adriaensz Backer, and his students were Jan Jansz. de Stomme, and Jacob Potma. His sons Julius and Frank also became painters.

SIZE: 29 x 22.5 inches including the frame.
PROVENANCE: English Private Collection for many generations.



£8,950

Portrait of a Young Gentleman c.1660; Attributed ...

Item Ref
9195/6

Oil on canvas now in a 19th century gilt frame in 18th century style.

The handsome young sitter wears his own hair; the periwig was just coming into fashion and not all the gentry wore them at first. His cravat looks to be of Bruges lace .. very costly, and a la mode. He also wears, wrapped around him, an Indian silk tea gown; these were also highly fashionable and hugely expensive. So much so that, for his portrait, Samuel Pepys hired one, as he couldn't afford to buy.
The young gentleman stands in the classic and much favoured elegant pose, his elbow rests on the plinth of a huge column; this was not just an artistic conceit, but symbolic. The column represents the sitter in that he is the pillar of his House or family; clearly he was the one who was, or soon to become, the head of the family.

JOHN GREENHILL (c.1642-1676), was an English born portrait painter whose initial training is unknown but who rivalled the leading London artists of the seventeenth century.
The Restoration of King Charles II (1630-85) stimulated an upheaval within the cultural sphere, in particular artistic patronage. Portrait painters such as Sir Peter Lely quickly found favour amongst the highest ranks of society, and as a result many continental artists migrated to England in a bid to win the patronage of the monarch, prosperous courtiers and powerful statesmen. Greenhill was amongst very few English artists able to compete with the popularity and skill of foreign artists and just one month before his premature death, he was still considered one of the most talented portrait painters of the age.
Of all the artists to emerge from the studio of Sir Peter Lely (1618-80) – the dominant artist in England in the late seventeenth century – John Greenhill was, as George Vertue noted, “the most excellent.” He is known to have joined Lely’s studio by 1662, but seems to have left fairly soon afterwards to establish his own practice. Vertue claimed that Lely was jealous of his pupil’s ability. He was commissioned to paint a number of leading figures of the court, including Anne, Duchess of York, and even the King. However, his dissolute lifestyle led to the end of promising career – he died barely into his thirties, after falling into a flooded gutter, drunk, in Long Acre, leaving a wife and young family behind.
SIZE:46 x 39 x 3.25 inches including the frame.
PROVENANCE: Private Collection, Surrey.
£8,950

James II walnut armchair c.1685.

Item Ref
9159

A walnut armchair of excellent quality c.1685, in perfect condition, the walnut of good colour and patination, recently expensively, and appropriately, re-upholstered.
This beautiful chair, with the then newly fashionable 'os de mouton' or 'horsebone' front legs, has marked similarities to the pair made by Thomas Roberts, carver and joiner to the Royal Household, for James II (now at Knole). Roberts held this important position throughout the reigns of James II, William and Mary, and Anne. His name has become almost synonymous with the elaborate walnut chairs and stools of the period, carved with ‘mouldings and foldings’, as they are often described in the accounts. Their scrolling arms and stretchers, also referred to in the documents as ‘horsebone’, seem to derive from Flemish and Dutch prototypes in the so-called auricular style.
This chair is not just a piece of usable and functional furniture, but is also a lovely Baroque work of art redolent of its period.
DIMENSIONS: 41.5 inches tall, 24 inches wide, 26 inches deep.
PROVENANCE: South West England private collection.
£1,850

Pair of Portraits of Sir Neville and ...

Item Ref
9078

A pair of oils on canvas in good carved and giltwood frames. These were probably the marriage portraits of Sir Neville and his first wife Dorothea.
Sir Nevill(e) Catlin, sometimes written Catlyn or Catelyn or Catline, was an English landowner and politician from a Norfolk family long active in local and national affairs. Baptised on 3 March 1634, he was the eldest surviving son of landowner and politician Richard Catlin (1583 – 1662) of Kirby Cane and his second wife Dorothy (1605 – 1672), daughter of landowner and politician Sir Henry Nevill of Billingbear and his wife Anne, daughter of Henry Killigrew. His father, who supported the King in the English Civil War, had been disabled from sitting in Parliament in 1644 and suffered sequestration of his estate, but was discharged without fine in 1647. His older half-brother Thomas Catlin died fighting for the Royalist side in the Second Battle of Newbury in 1644 . In 1650, he entered King's College, Cambridge.

In 1658 in London he married his first wife Dorothea, daughter of the judge and politician Sir Thomas Bedingfield and his wife Elizabeth. After her early death he married Elizabeth, daughter of Robert Houghton of Ranworth and his wife Elizabeth, daughter of Sir John Corbet, 1st Baronet, of Sprowston, but she died in 1681. His third marriage was to Mary, sister of Sir Charles Blois, 1st Baronet and daughter of Sir William Blois of Grundisburgh and his first wife Martha. In the first two marriages there were three sons and a daughter, but none lived long.

At the Restoration in 1660 he joined the Norfolk militia, initially as a captain of cavalry and rising later to major. In 1661 he was appointed a commissioner for tax assessment for both Norfolk and Suffolk and in 1662 when he inherited the estates of Kirby Cane and Wingfield Castle on the death of his father, he was knighted. In 1668 he was appointed Justice of the Peace for Norfolk and in 1680 for Suffolk as well, adding the rank of Deputy Lieutenant for Norfolk in 1676 and Suffolk in 1680.

In the 1685 general election he was unopposed as one of the two members for the city of Norwich and was listed among the opposition to the supporters of the Catholic King, James II. Unsympathetic to the political ambitions of the Catholic party, he opposed the repeal of the penal laws against Catholics and dissenters but was not against some relaxation. As an opponent of the King's absolute rule, he was stripped of his local offices, and when these were restored in October 1688 he refused to sit next to Catholic office holders. In the Convention Parliament of 1689 he was fairly active, being appointed to 15 committees.

He did not stand in the 1690 general election, retiring from national politics. Dying in July 1702, at Wingfield Castle, he was buried at Kirby Cane and succeeded by his younger brother Richard Catlin V.

JOHN HAYLS (1600-1679) also Hailes, was an English Baroque-era portrait painter, principally known for his portrait of Samuel Pepys. Hayls was a contemporary and rival of Sir Peter Lely and Samuel Cooper.
Pepys was so pleased with his wife's portrait, that he commissioned a portrait of himself and also persuaded his father Thomas Pepys to sit for the artist. Pepys also mentioned that Hayls painted the actor Joseph Harris as Henry V.
Hayls also painted portraits of Colonel John Russell (third son of Francis Russell, 4th Earl of Bedford), Lady Diana Russell, and the poet Thomas Flatman. He was known as a good copyist of the works of Van Dyck. He lived in Southampton Street, Bloomsbury, London, for some years, but then moved to a house in Long Acre, where he died suddenly in 1679.

SIZE: 35.5 x 30.5 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE: Wingfield Castle, Sussex, then by descent to the Lords Berners of Ashwellthorpe Hall, thence to Faringdon House. (see last image).
£11,650

18th c. French gateleg dining table

Item Ref
8239

An unusual large 18th c. double gated dropleaf French farmhouse table in chestnut of lovely colour; probably from Gascony. The split baluster legs open as supports for the leaves. Dummy drawers at each end.

SIZE; height 32 inches, width 50 inches, depth 82 inches open (27 inches closed).
PROVENANCE; French farmhouse.
Private Collection, Hampshire.
Private Collection, North Yorkshire Dales

NOTE - PRICE DOES NOT INCLUDE SHIPPING
£3,950

Portrait of a Boy and Dog c.1740: ...

Item Ref
8845

Oil on canvas, in a good quality reproduction 18th century frame.

Probably a member of the squirearchy, the young boy looks confidentally out at the viewer, standing with one hand on his hip, the other on his dog.
Although the animal was probably his pet, in portraiture a dog represents fidelity and trust; also when included in a child's portrait it can signify how children, like animals, need to be trained and disciplined to become responsible adults.
This portrait would have been painted by one of the many provincial portraitists working at the time. Often self taught and untutored, they frequently created entrancing images of their sitters...rarely flattering, they have a powerful naive directness that makes them very appealing to the modern viewer.

SIZE: 30 x 24.5 inches canvas
37 x 32 inches inc. frame..
PROVENANCE: Hampshire Private Collection.
£2,550

Portrait of a Boy of the Crawley-Boevey ...

Item Ref
8871

Oil on canvas in a giltwood frame.

A charming portrait of a young boy likely to be a member of the Crawley-Boevey family, late 18th century, painted within the feigned oval that was so fashionable at the time.
It is possible that the sitter is Sir Thomas Crawley-Boevey, 3rd Bt., born on 28 November 1769. He was the son of Sir Thomas Crawley-Boevey, 2nd Bt. and Ann Savage. He was baptised on 1 December 1769 at Flaxley Abbey.
He married Mary Albinia Page, daughter of Sir Thomas Hyde Page and Mary Albinia Woodward, on 28 October 1807. He died on 10 January 1847 at age 77 at Flaxley Abbey and was buried there.

The artist is unknown and was probably one of the many provincial portraitists of the 18th century with influences by Kneller, Jervas, Richardson and other top artists; this mixture became a no nonsense, direct style of portraiture typical of the English School.

SIZE: 22 x 19 inches.
PROVENANCE:Collection of the Crawley-Boevey baronets who had Flaxley Abbey, Gloucestershire (see Image 8) as their seat since 1642.
Sold by direction of Sir Lance V.H. Crawley-Boevey (1900-1968) by Bruton, Knowles and Co. at the Six Day Sale of the Contents of Flaxley Abbey. Bought by F. Baden Watkins the new owner of Flaxley.
Lined and restored for Flaxley Abbey Estate Ltd by Frost & Reed Ltd. c. 1965.

Between 1962 and 1963 Flaxley Abbey's interior was restored by Tony Award winning theatre and set designer Oliver Messel.
Lynne Christina Watkins sold much of the Flaxley collection, including this portrait, in March 2015.
£2,850

Oak 8 day longcase clock by Samuel ...

Item Ref
9122

A good quality oak 8 day longcase clock by Samuel Whalley of Manchester. Dial features date this clock to c.1735 (eagle/urn spandrels, fleur-de-lys hour spacers, quarter-hour chapter).
The case is of the best oak, banded with mahogany, and the hood has a fashionable 'caddy top' with blind fretting (slight damage). Tall and elegant, the clock is of exceptional colour & patina with an attractive ogee arched door. 8-day movement with brass dial with engraved and silvered chapter ring, signed ‘S. Whalley. Manchester’
£750 spent in August 2021 restoring the movement which is now in excellent order throughout, with the exception of the date ring, which no longer functions.

Samuel Whalley, clockmaker; married Mary Shallcross in 1733. Died 16 June 1744. The couple had a son, Samuel, who was admitted to school in 1750. This Samuel became a watch maker in Manchester, as did his son, also a Samuel. (Brian Loomes "Lancashire Clocks".)

DIMENSIONS: 84 inches tall, 19 inches wide, 9.5 inches deep.
PROVENANCE: Yorkshire private collection
£2,950

Bristol delft bianco supra bianco plate c.1760-70 ...

Item Ref
9180

A rare large , multicoloured, Bristol delft plate, with scalloped edge, the centre delicately painted with a lakeside scene and two figures conversing. This is the highly fashionable Chinoiserie taste which swept the country at this time. Bianco supra bianco was probably introduced into England by Magnus Lundburg, an artisan from the Rorstrand factory in Sweden, in the 1750s, who was likely employed at the Redcliff Back Pottery in Bristol.
As is usual with delftware there are some nibbles to the edge.
SIZE: 12 inches diameter.
PROVENANCE: The Collection of Sir William Whitfield CBE, St Helen Hall, County Durham. (Image 4)
£298

Original Pratts Road Map 1930.

Item Ref
pratts

Pratts High Test Plan of Watling Street and Principal Roads from Dover to Holyhead.
This attractive highly collectable vintage map shows the route of the old Roman road of Watling Street "A.E. Taylor" printed at lower left corner and published in 1932.
Alfred Edward Taylor was commissioned to create a series of maps of the United Kingdom and Ireland to encourage people to drive around the country, preferably using the premium petrol and oil...Pratt's High Test.
In many cases these towns and villages are accompanied by a beautiful little illustration of the town's high street or other notable landmark.

Taylor designed many decorative maps for Pratts Oil (which became Esso), clearly acknowledging an inspiration of historic road, itinerary strip and route maps such as those by John Ogilby and earlier. It is a bright and colourful depiction of the route that features a decorative cartouche and compass, literary quotes and pictographs of places of interest. Copies are held by the National Trust (UK) and Norman B. Leventhal Map Center (USA), the Victoria and Albert Museum, and many other significant collections because of it wide appeal and decorative form.
Dotted across the maps are amusing observations and literary phrases... the whole thing has great charm.

SIZE: 34.75 x 22.5 x 1 inches framed.
CONDITION: Excellent, two or three scuffs or slight tears which can be seen on the images. PLEASE NOTE THAT WHAT APPEARS TO BE AREAS OF DISCOLOURATION OF THE MAP ARE ACTUALLY MY SHADOW REFLECTED IN THE GLASS.
PROVENANCE: One family since new.
£350

Tang Dynasty Attendant Figure, 7th - 10th ...

Item Ref
tang

An ancient Chinese attendant figure from a Tang Dynasty tomb, 1000 to 1300 years old.
Originally the figure, still bearing much of its pigment, would have held a wooden stick to symbolise the lighted torch that would be used to guide the deceased through the Afterlife.
The Tang Dynasty was an Imperial dynasty of China, with its capital at Chang'an (present-day Xi'an), the most populous city at the time in the world, it is generally regarded as a high point in Chinese civilization—equal to, or surpassing that of, the earlier Han Dynasty—a golden age of cosmopolitan culture. Its territory, acquired through the military campaigns of its early rulers, was greater than that of the Han period.

SIZE: 11 inches tall.
PROVENANCE: Acquired from the York specialist dealer 'Ancient World', who brought items direct from China. Then an English private collection for the last 23 years.
£595

Portrait of a Gentleman c.1750: Attributed to ...

Item Ref
8873

Oil on canvas later mounted on board, in ebonised and gilt frame.

ANDREA SOLDI (1703-1771) was an Italian portraitist active in Britain.
The only remaining source for this painter's early years is George Vertue, who in 1738 stated he was "about thirty-five or rather more", had been born in Florence and had come to England in about 1736 on the advice of British merchants belonging to the Levant Company, who had commissioned their portraits from him during his travels in the Middle East. From 1738 to 1744 he won much success in London's art market and among Italophile noblemen back from their Grand Tour, being preferred to both English portrait practice (fluctuating between Rococo and Kneller-like styles) and to other Italian portraitists in England at the time, such as the Cavaliere Rusca (worked in London 1738–39), and Andrea Casali (worked in London 1741–66). Beginning "above thirty portraits" from April to August 1738 alone (according to Vertue), Soldi's only serious rival was Jean-Baptiste van Loo (in London 1737–42). Particular patrons included the 2nd Duke of Manchester, 3rd Duke of Manchester, 3rd Duke of Beaufort and 4th Viscount Fauconberg. Soldi died in London.

SIZE:35 x 30 inches inc. frame.
PROVENANCE:With Jess Aplin Antiques, Cambridge.
From where acquired by Christopher Hogwood CBE.

CHRISTOPHER JARVIS HALEY HOGWOOD, conductor, harpsichordist and musicologist, born 10 September 1941; died 24 September 2014 at home in Cambridge.
Founder of the early music ensemble the Academy of Ancient Music, he was an authority on historically informed performance and a leading figure in the early music revival of the late 20th century.
At the time of his death, Hogwood was Honorary Professor of Music in the University of Cambridge, Consultant Visiting Professor of historical performance in the Royal Academy of Music and visiting professor at King's College London. He was an Honorary Fellow of Jesus College, Cambridge and Pembroke College, Cambridge.
In 1989, Hogwood was appointed a Commander of the Order of the British Empire (CBE). He was the recipient of the Halle Handel Prize in 2008.
£4,795